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Micro-Batch Wines

About...

Me, Winemaking Style, Name Orgin

I have been wanting to do this for a good while now. Ever since I was young, I wanted to make wine, my grandma who I spent a lot of my childhood with would always pour me a little bit of Pinot Grigio and talk my ear off about wine. When I was growing up my mom’s friend owned a winery where I worked and helped during my spring and summer vacations from school, after that I was hooked. After not being able to get into the navy due to being practically blind, my backup plan was to go back to school to get a degree in wine business. I did so in 2019 getting an associate’s degree and during that same year I also received my sommelier level one certification and am currently aiming on level two certification. The second I turned twenty-one I applied to numerous wineries all over the central coast and landed a job at a couple of them. Since then, due to all the up close experiences with wine I’ve had I figured I’d try my own hand at it.

I have learned and developed my own “techniques”, ideas, and thoughts on how grapes should be expressed and try to implement it here. As little intervention as possible, meticulously made, and tons of passion. At the end of the day though these are my own experiments that I can call my mine which I think is pretty cool. I’ve been trying to fuse together new and old school techniques and see what works and what doesn’t. The great thing about winemaking is that it is always evolving and new knowledge comes out almost every single week. The more you do the more you get better and thus the more you learn, winemaking isn’t just a process it’s a journey and wine to me is like that. A Journey with bumps, hiccups, struggle, but makes the pay off so worth it, something you want to spend time with and care for like any other person.. Hopefully I can put all this together and make something people genuinely enjoy.

The name comes from this one customer who came into a tasting room I worked at that I think had a little too much to drink on an empty stomach. This man kept asking me, “where is your soul Tyler?! where is your soul Tyler?!”I didn’t really have an answer so he made one up for me, saying that he seemed like ( I can’t remember what I even said) and the name stuck. I can’t say I’ve completely found my soul yet, but I think this process has helped me a lot since. I think everyone should do some soul searching at some point in my life, luckily here I can do both.

2021 Rskate

Process on how we made this wine

On the 2nd day of September (practically 5 weeks before last year's harvest) we picked around 189 pounds of grapes from Heart Rock Ranch yet again and we literally didn't even know we were going to end up making rose this year, we got a little cocky and just decided to go for it and see how it turned out. 14-20 year old vines on gravel soil, east to west facing vines, 860 feet above sea level overlooking the 101 freeway with sheep and goats watching us. After harvesting 189 pounds of sangiovese we took about 40-60 pounds of the grapes and just pressed them immediately and gave them little to no skin contact. On September 3rd we added yeast to the juice and it really started to start fermenting the next day (the 4th) and ended the 10th (for a total of 6 days to complete primary fermentation). We then took the rose and stored it in our containers and racked it once in November on the 16th and then bottled the wine on the 13th of April in 2022 and labeled it all up the next month, only a very few cases of this in total. Along the way we got some blending wine from a winery in the county, rose of sangiovese (which accounts for about 15% of the blend) and chenin blanc (which accounts for about 8% of the blend). Like previously mentioned, I had no idea we were going to try doing a rose so I wasn't really thinking of a label design or even a name for it. I went to bed thinking I needed to come up with a name by morning and that night I had a wacky dream of me rollerskating in a race with a bunch of friends in New York. I woke up and immediately thought that will definitely be the future name.

2021 Heart Rock Ranch Sangiovese

Process on how we made this wine, again

On the 2nd day of September (practically 5 weeks before last year's harvest) we picked around 189 pounds of grapes from Heart Rock Ranch yet again. 14-20 year old vines on gravel soil, east to west facing vines, 860 feet above sea level overlooking the 101 freeway with sheep and goats watching us. Before fermentation we manually destemmed all the grapes, crushed them, and then, SO2’ed them. The next day we added our yeast (5 grams to each tank which we had two of). Fermentation really picked up and started on the 6th (4 days after picking the grapes) and ended on the 14th, ( an 8 days total to complete primary fermentation) We pressed and racked our wine the 15th (the following day)into our containers for storage. We racked the wine once again in November on the 16th and then bottled the wine on the 13th of April in 2022 and labeled it all up the next month, only a very few cases of this in total.

2020 Heart Ranch Sangiovese

The process on how we made this wine

On October 7th around 7:00 am, we harvested 125 pounds of sangiovese grapes from Heart Rock Ranch (about 1 acre in size) In Paso Robles Adelaida District. The Vines age from around 14-20 years old and were planted on predominantly gravel soil, with east to west facing vines, and 860 feet above sea level. Pre-fermentation, we destemmed 75% of the grapes by hand meaning that we left the other 25% to be fermented whole cluster (meaning the grapes had their stems on during the primary fermentation). For fermentation, we used a yeast strained called RX60 and split up the grapes and fermented the 75% of grapes with no stem in one tank and the other 25% whole cluster grapes ferment in another tank. After both fermentations were finished, we let the 75% stemless tank do an extended maceration (sitting on the skins to absorb more color and flavor) for an extra two days and we let the 25% whole cluster tank do an extended maceration for 5 days. After fermentation, we then racked the wine (which is moving the wine from one container to another) to another container but did not press the wine to get more juice, meaning this wine is all free run juice. We then racked the wine twice (one time in December and one more time in March before bottling) chose to not fine or filter the wine for mouthfeel and texture purposes, and added just a bit of SO2 (sulfites) to preserve it. On March 9th we bottled and got 21 bottles in total. Being a young wine, we are going to let it rest in the bottle for another three to four months.

Contact Info

If you want any more info on the wine or want to get into contact our email address is
whereisyoursoulwineco@gmail.com

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